Crone Chronicles #43(original)
Life On Earth

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Crone Chronicles #43
Life On Earth


Looking to root in, sink down, find the grounding energy that centers your being? Then this issue of Ann Kreilkamp's original Crone Chronicles is just right for you!

We begin "In Beauty May I Walk," Cynthia Dagnai-Myron's loving remembrance of her Hopi grandmothers, living in an intact indigenous culture grounded in giving honor to both their gender and their experience. Vita Laume goes in search of such a culture (and her roots in it) in "Lithuania: Pilgramage to My Motherland." Any woman who has longed to rediscover her ancestors will root for Vita as she encounters challenging border officials, explores richly Pagan Northern European culture of her homeland, and makes new friends in the country of her native earth.

The "Fool" (the first card in the Tarot) can also be interpreted as "the Wanderer" and that energy illuminates the theme of connecting with the wider planet in our next pair of stories. Vivian Connolly's wry essay "Fear of Camping" describes her adventures while camping alone, while Rhoda Mead shows us how she grounds and centers even while constantly moving (!) and living a croneish nomadic life in "Home on the Road: Living in an RV." (If you've ever wondered what it's like for a croning woman to "hit the road" this article is for you!)

Or maybe your idea of "grounding" means getting intimate with the place you already are. What could be better than making your home into your hobby? In "Groundworks: How Lois Lewis, 72, Built Her Own Home", Becky Bee interviews the intrepid crone and builder who discovered the joys of eco-building her very own home with adobe and mud, and in this issue's Crones in Action feature, "Our Sisters on the Streets" Nadean Burington describes her encounters with the homeless women of San Diego.

The rest of this issue is a marvelous collection of homey tidbits: Judith Coscarelli's croning ritual, Alix Kates Shulman's discussion of Third Wave feminism, Native American elder Mahtowin on ceremony and ritual, Carol Rosin with more on stopping the militarization of space, and Judith Monroe's rabble-rousing poem "Witches." it's a rich stew of idea and story, juicy enough for many hours of reading and contemplation. 84 pages, edited and published by Ann Kreilkamp in the summer of 2000.rated pages, edited by Ann Kreilkamp, released in Summer Solstice 2000.

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