SageWoman #56 (rare)
Coming Home

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SageWoman #56
Coming Home


"Coming Home is not always what we expect; it may mean returning to our past or venturing into an unknown future; rediscovering our roots or blossoming into an entirely new reality," writes editor Anne Newkirk Niven in her introduction to this issue, created in the shadow of the September 11 attacks. Times were tough, and everyone was longing for safety, security, and a place to call home. Sounds familiar, doesn't it? The issue begins with Diana Paxson's reflections on coming home to the U.S. immediately after 911 (she was in Britain on September 11) and rediscovering the majesty of America's personal Goddess, Lady Liberty, and the worldwide connections between Goddess-folk around the world that transcends politics and even terrorism.

Archetypal journeys fill many of the stories in this issue. In Alice Rose's "Dreams of Home" the author's exploration of fear, longing, and inspiration climaxes when she visits her childhood home on Peak's Island, Maine; Carolyn Lee Boyd journey into the matriarchal past "In the Garden of the Winter Goddess" weaves a new myth into the present; and Bee Smith relates her gradual enchantment with Ireland (where she now lives) in "Itchy Feet."

More personal essays from Lady MoonDance ("Cradled in the Arms of the Goddess") and Nancy Smith Harris ("Finding Edna") and Nancy Campbell-Lavis ("Birthing Home from Within") find that looking for home is sometimes synonymous with finding it. The journey, as they say, is the destination, and in sharing their experiences with trying to find (or create) homes for themselves they give us, as readers, clues for discovering what is "home" to us.

Our columnists bring a rich feast, brimming with nuggets of wisdom: Linda Ledbetter shares potato magic in "The Enchanted Kitchen," women's health expert Mary Seger concentrates on treating and curing anxiety through natural healing and goddess meditation, Carol Christ muses on the connection between Goddess spirituality and process theology, and Joanna Powell Colbert writes an elegy to her home on Puget Sound that joyously fulfills the promise of her artwork that graces the cover of this issue. Plus rituals for airplane travel, for coming back to a childhood home (and perhaps some uncertain emotional resonances) and a dedication ritual to Brigid. This is a homey, gentle, and nurturing issue, sure to bring a sense of ease and comfort to all readers. 96 illustrated pages, published in the Winter of 2001.

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