PanGaia #16
Summer Magick
(original)

$6.95


PanGaia #16 - Summer Magick
Summertime, and the livin' is .... magickal.

This issue of PanGaia comes very early in the history of the magazine, and the boundless optimism of this issue demonstrates that youthful enthusiasm.

There's so much summer fun that it's almost hard to tell where to start. But let's begin with Denny Sargent's essay "Ho'omana" in which he introduces us to the festivals, myths, sacred places and deities of Hawai'i. Then there's Loreon Vigne (foundress of Pagan sanctuary Isis Oasis) account of how she came to build a Temple of Isis in rural California. An account of the reforestation of Shiva's sacred mountain in India (work that continues to this day) is followed by our Toe to Toe feature on that always-controversial topic: "How flamboyant should Pagans be?" (Or, "should we try to fit into mainstream culture, or let our "freak flag" fly?)

Our cover story this issue "The Beast Within: Shapeshifting and Animal Spirits" casts light on the legends and realities of magickal shapeshifting as a shamanic practice. (No cinematic werewolfs need apply.) Continuing in the vein of working magick in the natural world, editor Diane Conn Darling interviews the Rainforest Information Centre leader and leading deep ecologist Australian John Seed, with special note of his work in creating the transformative eco-ritual "the Council of All Beings."

The natural magick of Litha is the focus of Jae Sheddy's personal essay "Summer Solstice: Gift of the Goddess" while loremistress Diana Paxson's article "Living with the Lesser Gods" focuses on wights, brownies, and other house spirits that are the most common mystical beings that our ancient ancestors experienced in everyday life. Ms. Paxson asserts that we moderns can restore that ancient bond and offers a full ritual for honoring the household spirits of your very own home.

Magickal psychology and Goddess spirituality hidden in the tales of King Arthur? Just so, says, Anodea Judith in "What is in the Cup? Questioning the Myth of the Holy Grail" her examination of what this myth means to Pagans today. Continuing the metaphor of the Mystical Cup, "The Mythic Language of Crop Circles," examines a variety of the most popular forms of these mysterious summertime sculptures. Whether created by supernatural means or pure human will, you'll find that these enigmatic shapes share mystical knowledge and an otherworldly beauty. Celebrating the Sacred Marriage of Beltain is the focus of Pauline and Dan Campenelli's article, a new version of the Red Riding Hood story is featured on our short children's article and coloring page, go Pagan family camping with Lauren Foster MacLeod, and the summer stars are the focus of this issue's installment of "What's Up?" Plus reviews, Pagan short fiction, comics, science vs. mysticism, letters from readers, and much more. Edited by Diane Conn Darling and published in the summer of 1998. 80 pages.

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